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Keyword: Media Development 2015/1

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  • On the screen MD 2015/1

    On the screen MD 2015/1
    At the 44th Kyiv International Film Festival (25 October to 2 November 2, 2014) the Ecumenical Jury, appointed by INTERFILM and SIGNIS, awarded its Prize in the International Competition for full-length films to Difret (Oblivion) directed by Zeresenay Berhane Mehari, Ethiopia (USA, 2014). Access
    Posted: February 19, 2015
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  • Imagine a world without nuclear weapons

    Imagine a world without nuclear weapons
    In February 1990, the same month that Nelson Mandela (known as Madiba) walked free after 27 years behind bars, South Africa’s then-President, Frederik Willem de Klerk, issued written instructions to dismantle the nation’s atomic arsenal. By: Desmond Tutu
    Posted: February 19, 2015
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  • Thai freedom of expression: Waiting for the dawn

    Thai freedom of expression: Waiting for the dawn
    The increase of political conflict in Thailand from late 2013 to 2014 contributed to the downfall of freedom of expression and freedom of information both on the public and personal levels. In 2015, Thailand is going forward with a coup d’état government that is trying to infuse people with propaganda in the name of so-called “morals” or “Thai tradition”. We are now going back to the age of top-down communication from the head of state to the people, the communication model that used to be in Thailand 50 years ago. By: Walakkamol Changkamol
    Posted: February 19, 2015
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  • Cambodia: a long way towards freedom of expression

    Cambodia: a long way towards freedom of expression
    Freedom of expression is supposedly guaranteed in Cambodia. Both domestic laws and international instruments that Cambodia is bound by protect this fundamental right.1 Yet, restrictive legislation, media censorship and judicial harassment of civil society actors have created a culture of silence and impeded full enjoyment of this right. The situation of freedom of expression in the country remains dire. By: Chak Sopheap
    Posted: February 19, 2015
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  • Revisiting Cambodia’s contemporary media landscape

    Revisiting Cambodia’s contemporary media landscape
    A few months before the 2013 elections, many Cambodians began to break out of their culture of fear, silence and political ignorance and embrace civic engagement. They participated in opposition campaigns, demonstrations, and the elections themselves. The public domain has become a place for political discussion and the expression of dissatisfaction with the government, despite threats and warnings from the authorities (Khoun, 2013). As a result, the ruling party majority in the National Assembly was heavily reduced – from 90 in 2008 to 68 in 2013 – with the Cambodian National Rescue Party (CNRP) benefiting. What has changed? By: Theara Khoun
    Posted: February 19, 2015
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  • Tackling hate speech in Burma

    Tackling hate speech in Burma
    Former political prisoner Nay Phone Latt, 34, is the secretary of PEN Myanmar and executive director of the advocacy group, Myanmar ICT Development Organization (MIDO). In April 2014 he launched the anti-hate speech movement panzagar (“flower speech”), which has campaigned on social media and in public using street theatre. He spoke to Mizzima Business Weekly’s Jessica Mudditt about his passion for information and communications technology and his efforts to create a more tolerant society. By: Jessica Mudditt
    Posted: February 19, 2015
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  • Burma and freedom of religion

    Burma and freedom of religion
    Freedom of religion in Burma has become a controversial political issue after the Burmese government published a religious conversion bill in state-owned newspapers in May 2014 inviting input from citizens. The publication followed a pro-bill campaign spearheaded by a group of Buddhist monks called the Organization for Protection of National Race and Religion.
    Posted: February 19, 2015
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  • Burma through the eyes of Reporters Without Borders

    Burma through the eyes of Reporters Without Borders
    For 25 years, the international NGO Reporters Without Borders that monitors attacks on freedom of information worldwide was banned from visiting Burma. Inside the country, all freely-reported news and information was forbidden and the country’s leading journalists were detained in its 43 jails. For years, the military regime would suspend publications for trivial reasons and the repression spared no one involved in news production, not even printers, some of whom were sentenced to seven years in prison for printing poems with democratic messages.
    Posted: February 19, 2015
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  • Media freedom in Burma/Myanmar

    Media freedom in Burma/Myanmar
    The media in Burma are freer now than at any point in the last decade, yet significant challenges remain and there are troubling signs on the horizon. The abolition of the pre-censorship of the printed press, the return of daily newspapers and of formerly exiled independent newspapers and media outlets all point to demonstrable change since the beginning of the transition. It is also a better climate for journalists with the release of a number of journalists from jail during the transition.1
    Posted: February 19, 2015
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  • Media Development 2015/1 editorial

    Media Development 2015/1 editorial
    What’s in a name? In 1989, the ruling military junta changed the name of Burma to Myanmar, one year after thousands were killed in the suppression of a popular uprising. The change was recognised by the United Nations and by countries such as France and Japan, but not by the United States and the United Kingdom.
    Posted: February 19, 2015
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