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Speaking at the Global Ecumenical Conference on a New International Financial and Economic Architecture taking place 29 September to 5 October 2012 in Guarulhos, Brazil, Rev. Dr Karin Achtelstetter, General Secretary of the World Association for Christian Communication (WACC), said that “Any discussion about an alternative financial architecture must take into account the design, role and ownership as well as the powers that control information and communication structures.”

{wacc location="Brussels, Belgium"} {teaser}The climate of impunity for crimes against female journalists constitutes a serious threat to the most fundamental of free expression rights.{/teaser}Media Release: International Federation of Journalists (IFJ), 24 November 2011

Letter Ban Ki Moon 2011.pdf


In a letter addressed to UN General Secretary Ban Ki-Moon to mark International Day on the Elimination of violence against women and girls, the International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) points at the extreme levels of violence women journalists face while carrying out their professional duties.

The IFJ denounces aggression, threats, political pressure, violence, rape and abuse that women journalists have to face due either to their gender or simply for doing their job. The situation is made much worse by the prevailing culture of impunity which protects and emboldens the perpetrators of these crimes.

 

Mass and community media can unthinkingly reinforce stigmatisation and discrimination against people living with HIV and AIDS. Beyond the important question of language and image, there are those of care, respect, support, and human dignity. As one writer in this issue comments, “HIV and AIDS...

Mass and community media can unthinkingly reinforce stigmatisation and discrimination against people living with HIV and AIDS. Beyond the important question of language and image, there are those of care, respect, support, and human dignity. As one writer in this issue comments, "HIV and AIDS is not about 'us' and 'them'. It is about speaking out for community, inclusion, sufficiency, tolerance and justice." Plus+ two articles on communicating climate change, evaluating news coverage of Darfur, and inclusive communication in Latin America.