communication rights
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Everyone agrees that social media are failing to distinguish between truth and lies. That’s partly because the line is easily blurred, but also because social media are corporate entities running on profit. Few people agree on how to tackle the problem of fake news or misinformation fairly and effectively, although many have come to realise that civil society must play a role.

[video width="700" height="550" mp4="https://waccglobal.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/otranoticia-24-ciudadana-venezolana-en-imbabura-los-venezolanos-podemos-aportar-mucho-en-ecuador-solo-pedimos-trabajo.mp4"][/video] A WACC Global-supported project in Ecuador is contributing to the development of an inclusive and rights-based narrative on migration by producing new radio and web content that serves as a counterbalance to xenophobic discourse in the country. The civil society organization, Ecuadorean Network...

Free Press and four allies have filed a lawsuit (27 August 2020) challenging an order against social media companies. The US District Court, Northern District of California, will hear a complaint against President Trump’s “Executive Order on Preventing Online Censorship”, which targets online platforms with a range of official reprisals – including threats to their established legal immunity, investigation by government enforcement agencies, and the loss of significant government spending – for engaging in constitutionally protected speech, including combating misinformation online.

A WACC-supported project has been training Ecuadorian and Colombian citizen journalists on investigative journalism, media production, migrants’ rights, and human security to equip them with new skills that will help meet the communication and information needs of migrants and host communities in their midst.   Coordinadora de Medios Comunitarios Populares y Educativos del Ecuador -CORAPE (Ecuadorian Network of Community, Popular and...

With the onset of the current pandemic, things are bound to get a lot more challenging for many migrants and refugees, as well as for the societies that host them. The number of forcibly displaced people worldwide was already the highest it had been in decades even before the global coronavirus crisis. In 2016,  about 40 million people became internally displaced persons (IDPs) and 22.5 million,  refugees.  Most migrants are extremely vulnerable both to the health and socio-economic effects of COVID-19. They are constantly on the move, work in the service economy, and have limited access to public services. Women migrants are particularly affected.  We have read  stories of hundreds of Venezuelan migrants violating the government-imposed quarantine in Colombia by trying to return to Venezuela at all costs, where they hope to at least they access the country’s precarious health system and look after their families. Most had been working in Colombia’s informal economy and, after the lockdown, were unable to earn a living. 

The global Covid-19 pandemic has shown how vital it is to get accurate and trusted information to communities in languages and channels that they understand. It has also raised awareness of the opportunities - and rights-based challenges - of digital communication. WACC and its partners...