Media Development 2019/4
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Everyone agrees that social media are failing to distinguish between truth and lies. That’s partly because the line is easily blurred, but also because social media are corporate entities running on profit. Few people agree on how to tackle the problem of fake news or misinformation fairly and effectively, although many have come to realise that civil society must play a role.

[video width="700" height="550" mp4="https://waccglobal.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/otranoticia-24-ciudadana-venezolana-en-imbabura-los-venezolanos-podemos-aportar-mucho-en-ecuador-solo-pedimos-trabajo.mp4"][/video] A WACC Global-supported project in Ecuador is contributing to the development of an inclusive and rights-based narrative on migration by producing new radio and web content that...

The Washington Post (2 February 2021) reported, “Former president Donald Trump lost the 2020 election largely due to his handling of the coronavirus pandemic, according to a post-election autopsy completed by Trump campaign pollster Tony Fabrizio. The 27-page document shows that voters in 10 key states rated the pandemic as their top voting issue, and President Biden won higher marks on the topic.”