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The Washington Post (2 February 2021) reported, “Former president Donald Trump lost the 2020 election largely due to his handling of the coronavirus pandemic, according to a post-election autopsy completed by Trump campaign pollster Tony Fabrizio. The 27-page document shows that voters in 10 key states rated the pandemic as their top voting issue, and President Biden won higher marks on the topic.”

By Philip Lee

It’s a difficult question. Why do people need cinema? Is it merely to take us out of ourselves, to relieve ourselves temporarily of the burdens of life? Is it simply a form of escapism from the day-to-day problems that beset us – personal, familial, financial, moral, spiritual?

By Heidi Ippolito

2020 has been a year of apocalyptic revelations in the U.S., uncovering national failings and imaginative alternatives amidst turbulent times. An inadequate national response to a global pandemic, raging environmental disasters, a chaotic presidential election, and an ongoing reckoning for racial inequity and police violence.

By John P. Ferré

The last decade has been a strong one for critically acclaimed movies about faith. With the exception of Spotlight, the $20 million Universal Studios release about the Boston Globe’s investigation of paedophile priests that won Academy Awards for Best Picture and Best Original Screenplay, movies about faith have been independent productions made with modest budgets.