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Since the emergence of the communication rights movements in the 1980s, activists have advanced a vision of the right to communicate as a highly political enterprise. The main idea at the heart of the movement has always been that democratizing media and communication is a way to transform power structures in favour of the public interest and of people and communities whose concerns and stories are rarely seen and heard.

Toronto — The Covid-19 pandemic did not put a damper on the 2020 Global Media Monitoring Project (GMMP), Tuesday, Sept. 29, attracting thousands of volunteers from 145 countries worldwide. GMMP 2020 is the sixth in a series of extensive gender and media monitoring studies conducted every five years...

Public interest journalism addresses the needs of citizens in a democratic community. Journalism that serves the public interest acknowledges that citizens are able to comprehend the policies and decisions that affect them. It assumes they are capable of applying their experience and values to arguments presented to them and of acting in ways that can make a positive difference to the world around them.